Emily Blunt Online

Welcome to Emily Blunt Online - a comprehensive website dedicated to Golden Globe winning actress Emily Blunt who is best known for her roles in The Devil Wears Prada, Edge of Tomorrow, Into the Woods, and Young Victoria. This site is determined to bring you the most up to date information on this talented performer and her career. I hope you enjoy your visit!

I have added two images from the new Hollywood Reporter cover shoot featuring Emily & Paula. I think this is a beautiful shoot and can’t wait to see more outtakes from it!

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Emily Blunt Online > 2016 > 003

09.29,.16
Posted by Ali

Emily and Paula Hawkins are on the cover of the new issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

“There’s just so much judgment with women,” says star Blunt as she takes on a tough and not at all likable (“my least bloody favorite word in the industry”) character in Universal’s film adaptation of a blockbuster novel that highlights the darker urges of suburbia — but please, says author Paula Hawkins, stop comparing it to ‘Gone Girl.’

“I stink terribly of onions,” is the first thing Emily Blunt says, right before she leans in for the customary Hollywood air-kiss greeting on a warm September morning. “I’ve just been cooking at home.”
We’re meeting in a tiny 10-seater coffee shop in Brooklyn, and Blunt — wearing a breezy cornflower linen dress, her hair tied in a bobbing blond ponytail — looks very much like she just stepped out of a country kitchen. “My baby pulled away from me while nursing because of the smell. ‘Ick,’ ” she jokes, referring to 12-week-old daughter Violet, who’s waiting for her at the nearby townhouse Blunt has been sharing with husband John Krasinski for slightly less than a year — long enough for their 2-year-old, Hazel, to begin stretching her vowels. “She’s sounding a bit American from what I see. ‘Can I have some wah-ta?’ ” the London-born actress re-enacts, her Queen’s English shifting to a nasally New York accent. “I was like, ‘Wodder?’ And she went, ‘No, it’s wah-ta.’ I was like, ‘Oh, for God’s sake!’ ”

It’s immediately obvious why Blunt, 33, was chosen for one of the three female leads in The Girl on the Train, Universal’s much-anticipated R-rated adaptation of Paula Hawkins’ best-selling thriller. She’s perfect for Anna, the beautiful, happily married mother living a life of upscale bliss whose typical worry is whether her baby’s pureed fruit is organic.

Except, of course, that’s not the part Blunt will be playing in Girl on the Train, which opens Oct. 7. Instead, she’s starring as Anna’s nemesis, Rachel, a 32-year-old blackout drunk and sometime stalker who may (or may not) have witnessed (or committed) a crime while inebriated. It is by far the darkest, roughest role the British actress and soon-to-be Mary Poppins (she is about to uproot the entire family to London for eight months to start shooting the Disney musical) has yet attempted. Which, naturally, is what drew her to it.
“With so many movies, women are held to what a man considers a feminine ideal,” says Blunt, sipping a soy cappuccino. “You have to be pretty. You have to be ‘likable,’ which is my least favorite bloody word in the industry. Rachel isn’t ‘likable.’ What does that mean? To be witty and pretty and hold it together and be there for the guy? And he can just be a total drip?” That Blunt herself seems extremely likable as she says all this only underscores her point.

“People say, ‘Oh, she’s way too beautiful to play her,’ ” says Hawkins of the actress who’ll be portraying her literary creation. “But that doesn’t matter. The thing about Rachel is her self-loathing, about what she feels about herself, and Emily really brought that out in the way she carries herself. All that damage is visible.”

The Girl on the Train was last year’s single-biggest literary phenomenon. It sold nearly 6 million copies in the U.S. alone and more than 15 million worldwide. It spent 88 consecutive weeks on The New York Times best-seller list — debuting at No. 1 in all formats, from hardcover to e-book to movie tie-in paperback — and has been published in 50 countries in more than 40 languages.

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09.29,.16
Posted by Ali

Emily Blunt talks about the forthcoming film adaptation of The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins’ bestseller about an unemployed alcoholic who witnesses a disturbing event from a train window. Blunt discusses simulated sick and the differences in drinking culture between the US and UK. Co-stars Luke Evans and Haley Bennett also discuss voyeurism

09.29,.16
Posted by Ali

TVLine shares this exciting info that on October 15th Emily will do her hosting debut on Saturday Night Live!

The Girl on the Train is hopping off at Studio 8H.

Emily Blunt will make her Saturday Night Live hosting debut next month, TVLine has learned exclusively. An NBC spokesperson declined to comment, but I’m hearing the actress will headline the Oct. 15 edition (which falls one week after the release of her new thriller, The Girl on the Train).

09.29,.16
Posted by Ali

Emily talks to Access Hollywood about her role as Rachel and how it was liberating for her to play her.

09.27,.16
Posted by Ali

While on the press rounds for her latest film, The Girl on the Train, Emily Blunt spoke to us about taking on the iconic role of Mary Poppins in Disney’s forthcoming sequel to the classic 1964 film.

She spoke of the pressure of taking on the role, how the character and the film are ’emblematic of people’s childhoods’, and how she hopes to find her version of the character during the rehearsal stage, which begins in November.

She also reveals that she’s closer to the books, and so we may end up seeing a different take on the much loved Nanny when Rob Marshall’s film is released.

Stefan Pape is the man asking the questions, here’s the video.

09.27,.16
Posted by Ali

09.27,.16
Posted by Ali

Emily shares with Entertainment Tonight why John is the perfect man for her.

Emily Blunt is opening up about why her husband of six years, John Krasinski, is the “perfect man.”

“He is my perfect man, you know, he is funny and warm and bright and confident and a sort of emboldening person to be around,” the actress gushed to ET while promoting her new film, The Girl on the Train.

“I think it depends on your idea of perfection,” the mom of two added, when asked if she believes there’s such a thing as the perfect couple. “It shouldn’t be an ethereal thing that you can’t reach. I think that everyone’s version of perfect is different.”

Adding to Krasinski’s perfection, Blunt praised his parenting skills to their two daughters, 2-year-old Hazel and 3-month-old Violet.

The doting dad is “so much more adventurous,” than Blunt, she admitted.

“[He will] throw Hazel on the back of a bike and take off somewhere and go on some crazy adventure. He is so hands-on and so committed.”

With the 33-year-old actress currently promoting The Girl on the Train, the couple are juggling work commitments with family life, with Blunt saying she aims to not be away for more than two days.

Luckily, when the gorgeous actress is traveling, her eldest daughter steps into big sis mode!

“She loves [being a big sister]” said Blunt. “She is so sweet with her.”

When the family do get quality time at home, Blunt enjoys cooking and is looking forward to her girls being old enough to enjoy her “dream” weekend meal tradition.

“Right now I have a 2-year-old, who is a little bit of a fussy eater, so it’s not like I can cook the same thing for her that we would eat. But my plan is to do [what we did] growing up, which was that every Sunday we would do a Sunday roast – cook it all day, then eat it around 4pm or 5pm. It was such a tradition that we all looked forward to.”

To watch the video of her interview go here.

09.27,.16
Posted by Ali

Emily & her co-stars did an interview yesterday with AOL’s BUILD Series London to discuss their film The Girl On The Train. I have added images to the gallery from the interview.

Gallery Links:
Emily Blunt Online > 2016 > September 21 | AOL’s BUILD Series London – The Girl On The Train

09.22,.16
Posted by Ali

A great article from Time!

The actor plays a voyeur in The Girl on the Train, but she discourages viewers from projecting their own fantasies onto her life

Emily Blunt has come a long way from her star-making turn as a Louboutin-loving fashionista in 2006’s The Devil Wears Prada. To play the lead role in The Girl on the Train, out Oct. 7, she had to deglamorize like never before. “Talk about no makeup,” she says over salmon teriyaki and iced green tea at a Brooklyn sushi joint on a late-summer evening. “We added makeup to make me look even more like I had no makeup.” Each day she was decorated with prosthetic under-eye bags, varicose veins and rosacea, along with a changing array of contact lenses meant to evoke various stages of inebriation: pinkish for buzzed, bloodshot for hammered, tinged with yellow for brutally hung over.

Yet for all the attention on the minutiae of her appearance, the key to playing such a truly damaged character—a divorced, infertile alcoholic obsessed with the perfect-looking lives of a couple she whizzes past on her daily commute—lay far beneath the bleary-eyed surface. To bring Rachel Watson to life, Blunt, 33, had to learn how to identify with the humiliation and isolation familiar to many addicts. She disappeared so thoroughly into the character that even her husband, actor and director John Krasinski, says he didn’t recognize her onscreen. “For the first time ever,” he says, “I forgot it was my wife.”

High praise as that may be, Blunt will need to impress legions of tougher critics: the millions of readers who buoyed the movie’s inspiration, Paula Hawkins’ 2015 novel of the same name, to the No. 1 spot on the New York Times best-seller list for 13 weeks straight. While the book is the kind of impossible-to-put-down Hitchcockian psychodrama that begs for a film adaptation, its success creates a daunting bar for the movie to clear. “That’s what I found so appealing,” says Blunt. “It’s less about the thriller of whodunit. It’s the idea of your blackout drunk protagonist making sure she didn’t do it.”

The novel weaves together the perspectives of three interconnected women. There’s Rachel, who rides the commuter train from suburban Westchester into New York City. (The movie transplants the story from the book’s London setting to the U.S., though Blunt keeps her accent in tribute to Hawkins’ story.) Then there’s Megan (Haley Bennett), whose house Rachel’s train passes each day and who, Rachel imagines, has a perfect marriage. And finally there’s Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), the real estate agent whom Rachel’s husband (Justin Theroux) left her for. When Megan goes missing, Rachel believes she can help solve the mystery— though she can’t be sure that she didn’t, during a blackout, have something to do with Megan’s disappearance.

The challenge for director Tate Taylor, whose credits include the 2011 civil rights-era drama The Help and the 2014 James Brown biopic Get On Up, was to produce an unflinching portrait of addiction without skimping on the pleasures of a thriller. “I was really protective of the addict and her emotions,” he says. “I’ve been touched by it—everybody has at some point. I didn’t want to make a film where it was not treated properly.”

Since breaking out stateside in Prada, the London-born Blunt has shown uncommon range as an FBI agent (Sicario), a singing baker’s wife (Into the Woods) and a bona fide action hero (Edge of Tomorrow). She knew how easily portraiture could slide into caricature. “I was nervous to do that drunk-uncle act,” she says. To avoid the pitfalls (and pratfalls) of exaggeration, she immersed herself in literature on substance abuse, talked to recovering alcoholics and watched lots of the A&E reality series Intervention.

“You see the humiliation of being an addict and what it does to your family,” Blunt says of the show’s depiction of chemical dependency. “And physically, I needed to see how alcoholics move when they’re really wasted.” Those movements had to be calibrated for every scene, so Taylor and Blunt created a system of levels to indicate drunkenness that could work as cues—“kind of like the Homeland Security color codes,” jokes Taylor.

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09.21,.16
Posted by Ali